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Whole Wheat Couscous Recipes You Would Enjoy

by Zarmeen Zia
Published: Last Updated on 171 views
Whole Wheat Couscous Recipes You Would Enjoy

Wheat Whole the hard component of wheat is used to make the coarsely crushed semolina pasta known as couscous. Instead of rice, it makes a great side dish.

Because it has more added health advantages and a better flavor, many people prefer whole wheat couscous to couscous produced from semolina flour.

The interior, or endosperm, a portion of a durum wheat grain is ground to create semolina flour. It is employed to create a wide range of pasta dishes.

The semolina is formed into pellets, sprinkled with flour, sieved, and then rolled again until the pellets are roughly the size of a pinhead to produce couscous.

If you like couscous, then try our recipe “Best Vegan Couscous Recipes“.

In contrast to processed white flour, which has the bran removed, it retains all of its nutritional value.

Whole Wheat Couscous Recipe

The addition of green onions, Parmesan, and stock during cooking gives whole wheat couscous a flavorful boost. And it’s simple to turn this into a vegetarian dinner if you use veggie broth.

Ingredients

  • 1 1/2 cups whole wheat couscous
  •  2 cups chicken broth or vegetable broth (see notes)
  •  5 green onions, thinly sliced
  •  1/2 cup finely grated Parmesan cheese
  •  fresh ground black pepper to taste

Directions to Make

  • Bring 2 cups of homemade chicken stock or chicken broth (or veggie broth) to a boil using a heavy pan with a tight-fitting cover
  • Couscous is added, the heat is turned off, the pan is covered, and the mixture is allowed to settle for five minutes without being lifted
  • Slice the green onions very thinly and weigh out 1/2 cup of finely grated Parmesan cheese as the couscous boils
  • Remove the lid and fluff the couscous with a fork after 5 minutes
  • Allow it cool for a few minutes
  • Add the grated Parmesan and green onions
  • Serve hot and season with freshly ground black pepper to taste

Other Whole Wheat Couscous Recipes

Whole Wheat Couscous Salad With Feta

One of my favorite summertime side dishes is this salad made with whole wheat couscous. Crisp cucumbers, cherry tomatoes, red onions, and kalamata olives are incorporated with the couscous.

Whole Wheat Couscous Salad With Feta

It is combined with light lemon dressing and fresh herbs before being topped with salty feta.

Ingredients

  • 2 cups whole wheat couscous, raw
  • two cups of chicken or veggie broth and one pint of halved cherry tomatoes
  • 1 seeded and sliced cucumber
  • Twenty kalamata olives, halved, and 1/4 to 1/2 red onion, chopped
  • 4 tbsp. chopped fresh parsley
  • 4 tablespoons chopped fresh mint leaves
  • 6 ounces of crumbled feta cheese
  • Extra virgin olive oil, 1/2 cup
  • freshly squeezed lemon juice, half a cup
  • 1 to 2 chopped cloves of fresh garlic, salt, and pepper to taste

Directions to Make

  • Mix the olive oil, lemon juice, garlic, salt, and pepper in a bowl to make the dressing. Place aside
  • Couscous should be prepared as directed on the packaging. For more taste, I prefer to use broth rather than water
  • Combine the couscous, veggies, olives, and herbs in a big bowl. If serving right away, include feta cheese. Just before serving, if refrigerating, add the feta
  • Toss the couscous with the dressing to mix

Whole Wheat Couscous with Roasted Red Peppers

Simple and satisfying, couscous is the perfect Mediterranean-influenced carbohydrate side dish to accompany roast lamb and ratatouille.

By using the whole wheat version of this crushed durum semolina with chicken stock, rather than plain water, and by adding diced roasted red bell pepper it commands its quarter-share of the dinner plate with extra fiber, added nutrients, and a nuttier taste!

Ingredients

  • 1 cup whole wheat couscous
  • 1.25 cup low sodium chicken stock
  • 1 each red bell pepper
  • 1 tsp tomato paste
  • 2 Tbsp olive oil
  • 1 each bay leaf
  • freshly ground black pepper

Directions to Make

  • Dice, Clean, and roll red bell pepper
  • Add tomato paste, powdered black pepper, and a bay leaf to a medium saucepan along with one and a half cups of water, or better still low-sodium chicken stock. up to a boil
  • Add the roasted peppers, dried couscous, and olive oil. After thoroughly stirring, covering, and turning off the heat, let stand for 8 to 10 minutes
  • Before serving, remove the lid and fluff with a fork

Whole-Wheat Couscous with Parmesan & Peas

The little noodle known as couscous may be prepared in virtually no time at all. Fortunately, whole-wheat couscous cooks exactly as quickly as normal couscous.

In this couscous with an Italian flair, lemon zest makes a delightful contrast to the nutty Parmesan.

Ingredients

  • 14-ounce can of reduced-sodium chicken broth or vegetable broth
  • ¼ cup water
  • 2 teaspoons extra-virgin olive oil
  • 1 cup couscous
  • 1 ½ cups frozen peas
  • 2 tablespoons chopped fresh dill
  • 1 teaspoon freshly grated lemon zest
  • Salt & freshly ground pepper, to taste
  • ½ cup freshly grated Parmesan cheese

Directions to Make

  • Bring to a boil the broth, water, and oil in a large saucepan. After adding the couscous, turn off the heat. For five minutes, cover and let the plump
  • Peas should be prepared as directed on the box on the stovetop or in the microwave in the meanwhile
  • To the couscous, add the peas, dill, lemon zest, salt, and pepper; gently stir, and fluff with a fork. Add cheese before serving

Roasted Garlic & Herb Whole Wheat Couscous

Fresh basil and fragrant roasted garlic are combined in this delicious whole-wheat couscous recipe! It takes less than 10 minutes to prepare this delectable side dish.

Ingredients

  • a quarter cup of water
  • Dry whole wheat couscous, 1 cup
  • 3 minced roasted garlic cloves
  • 1/4 cup and 1/2 cup of olive oil
  • 2 tablespoons of freshly chopped basil, salt, and pepper to taste

Directions to Make

  • Bring a boil to the water
  • When it reaches a boil, add the whole-wheat couscous and blend
  • Cover, then immediately turn off the heat
  • Give the couscous 5 to 7 minutes to sit
  • Make couscous fluffy with a fork
  • Olive oil, fresh basil, and minced roasted garlic are added next
  • Add salt and pepper at this point
  • Serve after thoroughly stirring everything

Algerian Whole-Wheat Couscous with Red Beans and Vegetables

Hearty beans and soft vegetables are presented in a vegetarian version of the popular North African meal over a bed of light, whole-grain couscous.

Ingredients

  • 2 teaspoons olive oil
  • 1 medium onion (chopped)
  • 1 small red bell pepper, cut lengthwise into 2 x 1/4-inch strips
  • 1 small zucchini (halved lengthwise, diagonally sliced)
  • 1 medium carrot (diagonally sliced)
  • 1 medium rib of celery, cut crosswise into thin slices
  • 1 teaspoon minced garlic
  • 2 15.5-ounce cans of no-salt-added dark red kidney beans, rinsed and drained
  • 1 cup fat-free, low-sodium vegetable broth
  • 1 small sweet potato (peeled, cut into 1-inch cubes)
  • 1 large tomato (diced)
  • 1 teaspoon dried thyme (crumbled)
  • 1 teaspoon ground cumin
  • 1/2 teaspoon paprika
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1/8 teaspoon cayenne
  • 1 cup uncooked couscous (whole-wheat)
  • 1/4 cup minced parsley (fresh)

Directions to Make

  • Heat oil in a large pan over medium heat while being swirled to coat the bottom
  • Stirring constantly, cook the onion, bell pepper, zucchini, carrot, and celery for 5 minutes
  • Add the garlic and mix. Cook for 30 seconds while occasionally stirring
  • Add the tomatoes, sweet potatoes, beans, broth, thyme, cumin, paprika, salt, and cayenne pepper
  • Bring to a boil on a high heat setting. Set the thermostat to low. Cook the veggies until they are soft for 12 to 15 minutes while covered
  • Meanwhile, prepare the couscous using the package directions, omitting the salt. Fluff with a fork. Transfer the couscous to serving plates
  • Spoon the vegetable mixture over the couscous. Sprinkle each serving with parsley

Whole-Wheat Couscous with Almonds

By using whole-wheat couscous, this side dish gains fiber. It tastes better when served at room temperature as opposed to chilled.

Ingredients

  • Whole-wheat couscous, 1 cup
  • 3 tsp of almond slivers
  • Extra virgin olive oil, 1 teaspoon
  • 1 plum tomato, cut roughly
  • a tbsp. of minced parsley
  • one tbsp of washed and drained capers
  • 1 minced garlic clove

Directions to Make

  • Place the couscous in a medium bowl and pour 1 1/2 cups of boiling water over it. Stir, cover, and let it stand for 10 minutes
  • Meanwhile, in a small skillet, toast the almonds over medium heat until lightly golden, about 3 minutes; remove from heat
  • Uncover the couscous and add the almonds, oil, tomato, parsley, capers, and garlic. Season the mixture with salt and fluff with a fork. Serve at room temperature

FAQs

How nutritious is whole wheat couscous?

Couscous made from whole grains is a rich source of fiber. Fiber has several health benefits. It can keep you fuller for longer and prevent blood sugar spikes.
Additionally, it could lower cholesterol, which lowers your risk of developing heart disease.

Is brown rice healthier than whole wheat couscous?

Couscous beats brown rice in terms of protein, while brown rice is superior in terms of other nutrients. Brown rice has higher concentrations of selenium, manganese, niacin, copper, and phosphorus than couscous does.

Conclusion

A little pasta known as whole wheat couscous is produced by milling and steaming whole grains. Because it has more added health advantages and a better flavor, many people prefer whole wheat couscous to couscous produced from semolina flour.

You should try these whole wheat couscous recipes, you might like all of these.

Here are a few more articles, you might like.

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